Diagnosed With Dementia


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What is dementia?

Dementia is an umbrella term to describe different progressive diseases of the brain. To get an overview of what dementia is, click on the dementia raising slideshow.

Please follow this link for accessible versions (Courtesy of the Alzheimer's Society)

There are lots of different types of dementia. The most common are:

Alzheimers disease – this is where your brain develops plaques and tangles which gradually kill off parts of the brain and cause it to shrink.  Depending on which parts of the brain are affected, then depends on what difficulties we can experience.

Vascular dementia – this is where the blood supply to the brain has been compromised. Our blood carries oxygen which is important to keeping out brain cells healthy and alive. A lack of blood supply to the brain can stop brain cells from functioning leading to them dying. Depending on which parts of the brain are affected, then depends on what difficulties we can experience.

Lewy Bodies dementia – this is where tiny clumps of protein develop inside the brain cells, which can stop the cells communicating properly leading them to die. 

Fronto-temporal dementia – this covers a range of conditions where the cells in the frontal (front of the brain) and temporal (sides of the brain) lobes are damaged. People usually experience changes in personality, behaviour and may have language problems.

Depending on which parts of the brain are affected, then depends on what difficulties we can experience. We may struggle with our short term memory, planning, behaviour, emotions, problem solving, communication and looking after ourselves.

Please watch the Alzheimer's Society video below to learn more about dementia - What is dementia?

 

 

Accessible Version